Archive for the ‘vehicle’ Tag

UM: Benefits Beyond Medical Bills   Leave a comment

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At the break in a class I overheard a student say, “My husband is in the military, so we don’t need uninsured motorist (UM) coverage.” The same comment could be said by someone who had PIP coverage, auto medical payments coverage, health insurance, disability insurance, Medicare, or even workers’ compensation coverage.

Clearly, the benefits provided by the military, PIP, auto medical payments, disability insurance, and workers’ compensation can be substantial. Even as good as those benefits are, however, there are expenses not covered under those policies that would be covered by UM. Remember, UM pays what the insured is legally entitled to recover from the at-fault party. Often, monetary damages awarded by a court include things that none of the earlier referenced policies (or military benefits) will cover.

Let’s take a look at this issue by way of example and see what the benefits of UM coverage are, beyond just reimbursement for medical bills.

Suppose Bill is involved in a hit-and-run auto accident and is seriously hurt by the at-fault party. He is protected by a personal auto policy (PAP) with $50,000 of PIP (he increased the $10,000 basic limit to this higher amount after seeing the small additional premium charge) and $5,000 of auto medical payments coverage. His auto policy includes $250,000 of UM coverage and his personal umbrella includes $1 million of UM. Bill has no disability income policy. Additionally, he is covered by a health insurance policy provided by his employer.

As a result of the accident the following expenses and losses were incurred by Bill:

  • $75,000 for prior medical bills.
  • $175,000 for future medical bills.
  • $20,000 for prior lost wages.
  • $300,000 for future lost wages.
  • $1,000 for a wheelchair since Bill is unable to walk now.
  • $10,000 for future wheelchairs.
  • $30,000 for a special van to transport Bill and his wheel chair.
  • $90,000 for future vans.
  • $20,000 to retrofit the house to accommodate the wheel chair.
  • $25,000 for a yard service for Bill’s remaining life expectancy, since he is unable to cut the yard now.
  • $100,000 for future pain and suffering.
  • $100,000 for the loss of “family comfort” with his wife.
  • $100,000 for the loss of the ability to coach youth softball.
  • $200,000 for future loss of the enjoyment of life.

Looking at the insurance that Bill has (disregarding the UM for now) what is seen is that the PIP and auto medical payments coverage are quickly exhausted. Bill can fall back on his health insurance, but keep in mind that he will likely incur a deductible plus a co-pay each year. Once Bill’s PIP is exhausted, his wage-loss protection is gone and with no disability income policy he is “up the creek.”

Suppose, however, that the accident happened to be work related and thus covered by worker’s compensation. In such case, Bill’s medical expenses would be fully covered, subject to the provisions of the workers’ compensation law. Bill’s lost wages would be paid, typically (in Florida) at 66.67 percent of his wages. The time period for which workers’ compensation will respond for lost wages varies from two years to a lifetime, depending on the type of disability. Remember, too, wage loss benefits are subject to a maximum per week, which in Florida is around $850 per week. The wage loss benefits paid to Bill by workers’ compensation would not fully replace his salary.

With or without workers’ compensation coverage, consider the monies awarded to Bill for which he has no coverage, except under UM. The excess medical expenses, lost wages, wheelchair, van, house modifications, yard service, pain and suffering, loss of family comfort, and all the other damages listed above would be covered by UM.

Of course UM isn’t always an inexpensive coverage, but when the cost is compared to what most folks spend on cable TV, cellular service, a country club membership, or eating out for dinner twice a month, the cost for UM is probably the lowest listed.

Even if someone is in the military, is retired, and/or has “a lot of other insurance,” the protection provided by uninsured motorist coverage is very valuable. Don’t be so quick to reject this valuable coverage.

” Our blogs are for general education and information only and may not represent your unique needs. Coverage will vary. Please contact your agent to verify your specific policy terms and conditions.”

Courtesy of FAIA, Authored by David Thompson, CPCU, AAI, API 

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Auto Insurance Coverage for Teen Drivers with Divorced Parents   Leave a comment

When a teenager receives her driver’s license, she often will be added to her parent’s auto insurance policy. But if her parents are divorced, teen car insurance could become a bit confusing.

A father teaching his teenage daughter how to drive.

 

Insurance companies and states have different requirements regarding coverage of additional drivers on an insurance policy, but here are some tips to review if you have a teenage driver with divorced parents:

If your teen has access to driving vehicles at both parents’ houses, then both parents might need to add him or her to their individual policies. Some companies may require that the parent with custody add the teenage driver to their policy. Divorced parents may want to contact their insurance companies to find out what is required in their situation.

Every state requires licensed drivers to have auto insurance coverage, which includes teen drivers, even those with a permit, when driving. If you have a teenager in your household who may be on your former spouse’s insurance, it may be a good idea to find out if your insurance would cover your teen while driving your car.

Safe driving techniques can help all family members save money on car insurance. Teaming up with your former spouse to encourage, educate and even monitor your teen might help to make him or her a better driver. Car crashes are the No. 1 cause of death for teenagers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

No matter which parent carries their teenager’s insurance, both can set rules for the use of the car. Here are some suggestions:

  • Prohibit cell use and texting when in the car.
  • Limit the number of passengers in the car when your teen is driving.
  • Establish a boundary of where your daughter can take the car.
  • Encourage your son to call you at any time for a ride if he feels he, or another driver, isn’t fit to drive—no matter what the situation is.
  • Require everyone—drivers and passengers—to wear seat belts.

Having a teenage driver in the family is always an exciting time for everyone. If you have a change in your family situation, contact your insurance agent to determine if any changes are needed for your policy.

“Our blogs are for general education and information only and may not represent your unique needs. Coverages will vary. Please contact your insurance agent to verify your specific policy terms and conditions.”

Courtesy of Allstate

You’re moving out of state — do you need new car insurance?   Leave a comment

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You’re moving out of state; it’s time to pack your bags, get your affairs in order and head off for new horizons. An additional consideration, one that sometimes isn’t top-of-mind, is car insurance. Specifically: do you need to get new car insurance when moving to a new state?

The answer is almost always “yes,” but with a major caveat.

When you move to a new state you usually have between 30-90 days to register your vehicle. Use those months to get your car insurance situation straightened out; do not do it before you move.

That is the major caveat: do not cancel your old car insurance policy before setting up your new one. Do not cancel your policy in one state and then move to another state before getting a new one. You should never drive — especially across state lines — without a car insurance policy. It is illegal, and potentially very costly if you get into an accident.

Indeed, your policy may change after you relocate even if you stay with the same provider. Your new state may have different laws and policies than your old one does, thereby adding or subtracting a few dollars from your monthly bill. You might also be commuting more (or less), which would also affect your premium. In your move you may have also acquired some new assets, including a new vehicle. Additionally, your car insurance provider might not be able to sell insurance in your new state — so it’s definitely best to check in.

When you register your vehicle in the new state must show proof of insurance. And the states must match; if you’ve moved to Florida, when you register your vehicle there you must have valid car insurance in Florida as well. Do not go to register your car without first getting your car insurance set after the move.

“Our blogs are for general education and information only and may not represent your unique needs. Coverages will vary. Please contact your insurance agent to verify your specific policy terms and conditions.”