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Lightning Safety Week – Surge Protection for Your Home   Leave a comment

lightning

At the first clap of thunder, seeking shelter indoors to avoid being struck by lightning is a priority. But it’s also important that what’s inside the structure is protected as well. According to the Lightning Protection Institute (LPI), a single bolt of lightning can carry over 30 million volts of electricity. A strike from a powerful charge like that could trigger a power surge that could damage expensive electronic equipment inside your home – or worse – spark a devastating fire.

As part of Lightning Safety Week (June 23-29), the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS) advises homeowners to take precautions to reduce the chances of lightning-related loss and disruption from power surges.

To reduce the risk of damage from a lightning strike, homeowners should consider investing in a whole-house surge protector, which offers protection against electrical surges or spikes. Many utility companies provide and install whole-building surge protection systems. If this is unavailable in your area, consider hiring a licensed electrician to install the protector.

There also are relatively inexpensive ways to prevent significant damage from a power surge. Below, learn how to keep expensive electronics from being damaged or destroyed by a sudden spike in voltage. Find additional lightning protection guidance for both businesses and homes at disastersafety.org/lightning.

PREVENTING POWER SURGE DAMAGE TO YOUR HOME

1. Unplugging electronic equipment when there is lightning in the area is the most reliable means of protecting that equipment from a power
surge.

2. Know the important difference between a surge suppressor and a power strip. A power strip plugs into your wall outlet and allows you to
plug in multiple electronic devices. However, a power strip does not protect equipment from being damaged by a spike in electrical power.
Like a power strip, a surge protector also gives the user the ability to plug in multiple electronic devices, but it also protects your
electronic devices from sudden power spikes.

3. Connect telephone, cable/satellite TV and network lines to a surge suppressor.

4. Make sure the surge suppressor has an indicator light so you know it is working properly.

5. Ensure the surge suppressor has been tested to UL 1449, which should be indicated on the packaging.

6. Purchase a surge suppressor with a Joule rating of over 1,000. The Joule rating typically ranges from 200 up to several thousand the
higher the number the better.

7. Look for a surge suppressor with a clamping voltage rating (voltage at which the protector will conduct the electricity to ground)
between 330 v, which is typical, to 400 v.

8. Purchase a surge suppressor with a response time of less than 1 nanosecond.

9. Avoid cutting corners. You don’t want to protect a $1,000 television or computer system with a $10 surge protector. For $25 and up, you
can provide much better protection.

10. Consider hiring a licensed electrician or home/building inspector to review the power, telephone, electrical and cable/satellite TV
connections in your home. Have them check that you have adequate grounding of the power line connection and your power distribution
panel. All of the utilities should enter the structure within 10 feet of the electrical service entrance ground wire and be bonded to
that grounding point.

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The Art of Coverage: Collectibles Insurance vs. Traditional Homeowners Policy   Leave a comment

stamp vase 1918 coin

The chances are good that you are a collector of something. So what makes something a collectible or when do you need to “Schedule” your personal belongings. The simple answer is: it depends.

Some of the most commonly collected items include fine art, sports memorabilia, wine, rare books, stamps and coins, antique rugs and tapestries, musical instruments, action figures, dolls, toys, auto and movie memorabilia, and guns.

Large private collections generally have proper risk management in place including fine-art insurance that covers the full value of the items. But many smaller collections (those valued below $1 million) tend to be insured under a traditional homeowners policy or have no insurance at all. If these collectors face a devastating event resulting in damage, they may discover too late that their coverage is not sufficient to address their financial losses.

In simple terms, the process of insuring collections of fine art and collectibles under a traditional homeowners policy tends to be time-consuming and difficult while possibly yielding lower limits and less expansive coverage when compared to obtaining coverage with a fine art and collectible insurance policy. The comparisons below address specific differences between the two types of policies.

Appraisals – Homeowners policies generally require appraisals for collections or individual items valued over $2000 as part of the underwriting process. Many collectibles insurance policies do not require appraisals at the time of application.

Deductibles – Zero-dollar deductibles are the standard for collectibles insurance policies with some offering additional deductible options. Homeowners policies may offer zero-deductible policies, but it is not as common.

Limits – The limit on fine art and collectibles coverage generally ranges from $500 to $2000 for a homeowners policy without the addition of a floater or rider. Even with an added floater or rider, homeowners policies tend to limit the level of exposure. A collectibles policy may offer coverage up to $1 million or more.

Coverage – One of the most important coverage differences between a homeowners policy and collectibles policy is the valuation of covered items. Homeowners policies tend to insure for actual cash value while collectibles policies insure the full collectible value of items in the collection. This distinction alone can reflect a startling difference in potential claims payments in the event of a loss. Homeowners policies generally cover named perils only, exclude coverage for items during transit, limit coverage on items stored away from the home to as little as 10 to 15 percent, and extend coverage to newly acquired items for only 30 days. By contrast, collectibles policies typically include all risk coverage and provide coverage for items in transit, items stored away from the home (such as in an office or storage facility), and newly acquired items for up to 90 days. Some collectibles policies may offer additional coverage benefits such as discounts for monitored fire and burglar alarms or items kept in a UL-rated safe.

Claims – In today’s insurance market, filing a claim against a homeowners policy may leave an insured vulnerable to premium increases at renewal or the possibility of non-renewal. With a separate collectibles policy, claims do not affect homeowner premiums or loss history. In addition, companies that offer collectibles insurance may have claims adjusters with a high level of expertise in this area. Adjusters with this specialized knowledge are better able to determine the value of unique or rare items, which should expedite the claims process and lead to a better outcome for the insured.

A detailed comparison of the benefits and limitations of standard homeowners insurance versus collectibles insurance demonstrates that specialty coverage can be very advantageous for even a small collector.

Standard homeowners policies have limitations for most common items such as Firearms, Jewelry, Furs, Silverware, Precious and Semi-precious stones, Money, Gold, Silver, Coin or Stamp collections etc. Anything that has a special value such as an oriental rug (worth more than an area rug you may purchase as a home improvement store), anything that is “one of a kind” that can’t be replaced by going to a local department store, a collection of things such a porcelain figurines, fine art, breakable art such as a vase or statue. These are things that may need to be insured by a personal articles policy. Sometimes referred to as “scheduling”, this is a policy that insures specific items at a specific value determined by an appraisal or other means of valuation.

If your $10,000 Persian rug is damaged but not insured for $10,000, it is a rug and can be replaced for about $150 at Home Depot. A 1938- 3 legged Buffalo nickel may appraise for several thousand dollars depending on the grade, but if it is not insured for that value, you guessed it, it’s just a nickel worth 5 cents. Sentimental value is dear to us and nothing can replace sentimental value but Grandma’s old wedding ring could be worth a few hundred dollars or a million bucks. Every insurance policy has limitations, exclusions and provisions that you may need to comply with before you are properly insured. Please contact Lee County Insurance Agency for additional information about insuring your valuables.

“Our blogs are for general education and information only and may not represent your unique needs. Coverages will vary. Please contact your insurance agent to verify your specific policy terms and conditions.”